marketing advice

Is it just me, or has the world suddenly been overrun with people dishing out advice that they’re just not qualified to give?

Advice that actually isn’t advice.

It’s an opinion.

And an uninformed, uneducated one at that.

It’s often those “empty vessels” that make the most noise, shouting their opinions over everyone else, and railroading everyone into doing things their way.

This is why I don’t do committees.

I’ve been asked to join so many committees over the years, and now my default answer is “no way.”

I’ve wasted too much time sat around a table whilst a committee of people who know nothing about copywriting or marketing decide the “best” things to include on their latest leaflet campaign.

I’ll put my two penneth worth in. Explaining how I’ve been learning and implementing marketing strategies for the last two decades. Demonstrating some of the scientific and psychological reasons behind my reasoning.

“IT NEEDS TO BE ORANGE.”

“OUR LOGO NEEDS TO BE BIGGER”

“HOW ABOUT MY HEADLINE?”

“NO, MINE’S BETTER”

“HOW ABOUT WE CHANGE THIS WORD IN THE FOURTH PARAGRAPH?”

Kill. Me. Now.

They say if you ask a committee to design a horse, you’ll end up with a camel.

I’ve made that mistake too.

We were revamping our email followup sequence for new members on our sports betting website earlier this year. It was really important to get it right, so we assembled a committee.

I was there.

So was our Marketing guy.

And the agency we outsource some of our copywriting and funnel-building to.

And our Ops Director.

And our Managing Director.

Five people, all critiquing every word of every line, of every email.

Including the most highly-paid people in the organisation.

We were probably paying upwards of £1,000 an hour to assemble this committee.

And we got nowhere. We ended up with a camel.

In the end, we scrapped the committee, and asked the Marketing guy (who writes brilliant copy) to write the copy. Then he got the agency to cast an eye over it and suggest improvements, before finally passing it onto the MD for final approval.

Much quicker, much more effective, and much less stressful.

By all means, listen to feedback and take advice from experts. But just make sure they’re actually qualified to be giving you that advice.

And don’t end up with a camel…